About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
's questions about whether egypt might get involved in some way, turkey as well. do you think -- do you see them rallying to hamas or not? >> the one government that's very sensitive to hamas and very friendly to hamas ironically is the morsi government in egypt. there have always been historic ties between gaza and egypt. egyptians are very sensitive to everything that goes on in gaza. >> many tunnels from egypt go into gaza to get supplies. >> absolutely. in fact, under mubarak it was much easier because mubarak couldn't care less about hamas. this is a very different issue here, because the muslim brotherhood in egypt really is the mothership, if you will, of hamas and other such organizations. but what will the egyptians do. they have recalled their ambassador from israel and they have told their people that look, president morsi is talking to president obama about bringing the fighting to a halt so that's one thing that we can look forward to. one thing that's very important, tomorrow is friday. there has already been calls for massive demonstration, a million people march, in cairo ag
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
will primarily from egypt. hamas is considered to be the muslim brotherhood of the palestinians and president morsi of egypt has been stepping in trying to assert. he withdrew his ambassador. not a huge move but trying to lend moral support. they're condemning the israeli actions calling for calm. now there's some talk about them canceling the camp david accords, revisiting that. forget that. at the end of the day, as much criticism as the egypts get from the americans and the israelis, they may end up being the ones to negotiate a broker's truce in this whole deal because they do hold sway with hamas. >> is it clear how long this is going on? israel will say -- >> absolutely, 50 years. >> well, and a very large umbrella kind of sense. but recently, you know, we are talking about israel saying they were bombarded in recent weeks. hamas says they're being bombarded in recent days. which is it? >> typical tit for tat. it has a life of its own and it could spread to a much wider region, much wider effects on the diplomatic and political events of the middle east that after all is in a very fragi
city. >>> there have been big protests in egypt. cairo is vowing it won't leave gaza unprotected. in a fiery speech, egyptian president morsi condemned what he calls israel's blatant aggression. >> we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us and the blood that flows from their children is our blood, too. >> the israeli government says palestinian militants have fired more than 700 rockets at israel over the past year alone and it wants that to stop. and southern israel near the gaza border is right in the rocket's path. near the gaza border, fred, good morning. you have been on the front line near gaza. what are you seeing there? >> hi, randi. we're seeing israeli troops massing there on the front line there. we are massing several sights where we're seeing tanks and bulldozers that are getting ready to invade gaza if they, in fact, are ordered to do so. they said that they're just g getting ready for it right now and perfect to conduct a round of offensive if they feel they are not achieving the goals they want to achieve with the
regarding that anti-islamic film. there had been rioting in egypt and of course, this is the contradictory thread of the narrative here, that it was riots that -- in egypt that led to the attack on the embassy in libya on the consulate in libya. so he's going to talk about having these two threads of information but his sense right from the start that it was a terrorist attack by answar al sharia. a pretty murky group, loose collection of characters. >> this is interesting to me. just to be clear, your source is saying general petraeus knew almost immediately or felt that it was a terrorist attack, knew the group involved, even though he told members of congress three days after the attack that it could have been spontaneous and there's also the statement made by the director of national intelligence on the dni the end of october who put out a statement saying in the wake of criticism of ambassador rice, saying that early reports indicated it might have been linked to -- might have been a spontaneous demonstration and ambassador rice went out on sunday saying -- five days after, saying it
is the role of egypt with its leadership. a relationship that is much closer now to hamas. is that something that the white house should be concerned about? i mean, that really does seem like really a wild card in all of this. >> suzanne, i don't think it's a wild card. you are spot on. they do need to be concerned about it. more importantly, they need to do something about it to insure that israel is able to prosecute what it needs against hamas and that egypt and the muslim brotherhood stay out of any type of direct engagement or support to what is taking place in gaza right now. that would truly inflame and kind of put into greater can i ones what's taking place in the middle east, so israel needs to breathe -- apologies. egypt needs to breathe through their nose and just stay where they are. hamas and israel are going to have to work this out, and they don't need to have other folks meddling other than to try to get them to calm down, you know, settle the situation a little bit. >> to the other story that we're following. obviously, the scandal involving the former cia director general d
've pulled your ambassador out of cairo. is that peace treaty stween israel and egypt on the verge of collapse? >> it's vital not just for israel, egypt, it's vital for the entire region, for the world. we understand this. we think the egyptians understand this full well. the egyptians have played a constructive role in the past mediating -- i think they can play the similar role today. >> are they? >> i think they can. >> but are that? >> that's all i can say right now is i think they can play a constructive role. and we hope they will. >> that suggests to me they're not yet doing that. >> well, right now the situation's very fluid on the ground. and hamas shows every intention of escalating further. it's not stepping down. >> mr. ambassador, thanks very much for coming in. we're watching this situation very, very closely. >> thank you, wolf. >> michael oren is the israeli ambassador to the united states. in our next hour we're going to take a look at what the u.s. -- if the u.s. can do anything about this escalating violence that's going on, the tensions escalating between the is
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)